When can kids sit in the front seat? (State by state)

Seating kids in the front seat is very risky. Front row is the most inappropriate seating option for kids, even if you are using safety seats.

The second serious issue is that air-bags harm kids in accidents. They are meant to protect the adults and not the children.

Air bags are designed to protect adults at least 5 feet tall and weighing around 150 pounds. Kids don’t reach these limits and so even if he is protected by a buckle the airbag is going to harm him.

An airbag deploys rapidly, within 1/20th of a second at a speed of 200 miles per hour. So if the kid gets hit by even the softest material at this speed he/she is going to get hurt.

And for all these reasons American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that all children ages 13 and under should always be seated in the back seat for safety and they should either be buckled up or must be seated in a safety seat.

Below is a guide showing – the safest sitting room in a vehicle for your kids.

Where is the safest place for your child to sit?

Middle Rear Seat

The safest sitting area in any vehicle is the middle of the second row. It is the least impact zone in any collision or crash.

In most of the cars, manufacturers leave an open area between the first and the second row. So if the kid’s safety seat is placed there, during a collision or a crash, chances of bumping on the first row seats are almost diminished. Secondly the middle rear seat is farthest from the side – which decreases the chance of bumps with other interiors of the car.

If you have a big vehicle which has 3 rows of seats or even a middle sized car having 2 rows of seats – then place the safety seat on the middle of the second row. Do not place the safety seat in the middle of the third row, because it is not the safest. Mostly there is no open area between third and second row seats.

Rear seat behind the driver

The second favorable position (after the middle rear seat) for seating a kid is the rear seat behind the driver. Although it is near to the side door, it increases the chance of the kid getting out instantly in a collision.

It also increases the chances of the driver getting out of the car and protecting the kid as soon as possible in any crash, because the driver is the nearest to this seat.

Rear seat behind the front passenger

Some suggest that this seat is safer than the rear seat behind the driver, because the victim of any accident can get out sooner, but according to us – it remains on the third position. The reason is that the rear seat behind the driver also gives the passenger the same safety standard and it is also the nearest spot for the driver to reach.

Front Passenger Seat

when can kids sit in the front passenger seat?

Seating your kid in the front passenger seat is never advisable – whatever the conditions may be. In fact it is illegal in many of the states in USA. There are some reasons for this:

Front passenger seat is very near to a car’s shield glass and its dashboard. In a collision if the passenger crashes with the glass or the dashboard then it can be fatal and not just injurious.

The seat is very near to the side door of the car, which is mostly hard toughened solid. Collision with the sides can lead to severe injuries,

This seat comes with an active passenger airbag meant to protect adults sitting there and if the airbag goes off, it will hit the baby seat and fling it forward with considerable force. Children who sit in the front seat before they’re larger in size are at risk for head injuries due to the impact of the airbag or the airbag’s ability to lift them off the seat and hit the top of the car.

Remember – Seating a child in front of an airbag is illegal.

However if the conditions demand no other option than to seat the kid in the front seat, for example if the kid needs constant monitoring due to health reasons, or if the car has only a single row of seat – then make sure

  • You get a valid pass to do so,
  • You deactivate airbag,
  • And position the seat as far as possible from the front glass and the car’s dashboard.

When can kids sit in the front seat: State laws

Alaska

If a child is less than one year old or weighs less than 20 lbs, than he must be seated in a rear-facing car seat. The seat must be federally approved.

After one year till 5 years the child should be seated in a child restraint – which should be federally approved, but only if the weight is more than 20 lbs.

If a child is more than 4 years old but not yet 8 years old and exceeds 65 lbs and is 57 inches tall then he may ride in a seatbelt.

If the child is 8 years old, but does not exceed the height and weight requirements, the driver may decide whether it’s appropriate to let the child ride in the seatbelt or continue using another federally approved child safety device.

(SEC. 2. AS 28.05.095)

Arizona

Children under eight years of age should be seated in a correctly installed child restraint system – if their height is less than four feet nine inches.

However if child restraint systems cannot be installed for all the kids due to lack of room in the vehicle – than at least one child (the smallest) must be in a proper restraint system.

(ARS 28-907)

Arkansas

In Arkansas the law requires children less than 15 years of age to be seated in a child passenger restraint system.

However the law also mentions that children weighing 60 pounds and more and at least 6 years of age up to 15 can be secured by a safety belt.

The age group in this state is lower the other states age group. After 6 you can seat you kid in the front seat provided the weight is appropriate – as required by the law.

(ARKANSAS CODE 27-34-104)

California

Children less than two years of age should be seated in a rear-facing child restraint system in a rear seat.

Children under the age of 8 but have exceeded 4′ 9″ height shall not need a restraint system and a safety belt will be enough – but still they cannot sit in the front seat.

Only after 8 years of age a child can sit in the front seat.

(SECTION 27360 – 27368 OF THE VEHICLE CODE OF CALIFORNIA)

Colorado

Children below one year of age weighing less than 20 pounds should be positioned in a rear-facing child restraint system in the rear seats.

Till four years and 40 pounds he can be seated in a rear-facing or forward-facing child restraint system.

After eight years he can be secured by a safety belt and will not need a restraint system.

In Colorado the children seating laws are very strict for the drivers too which means a driver can be pulled over and ticketed for any violation in child seating laws.

(COLORADO REVISED STATUE 42-4-236)

Connecticut

Children below two years or 30 pounds must remain in a rear-facing child restraint. The law specifies the harness system too – which should be a 5-point harness and nothing less.

Till 5 years and 40 pounds they can be seated in a rear-facing or forward-facing child restraint with a 5-point harness. They can be seated in a booster seat too if the seat fits the required specifications.

A rear facing car seat shall not be used in the front seat of a vehicle.

After 8 years and 60 pounds he can be secured by a seat belt.

(SEC. 14-100A (D) (1))

Delaware

All children above 8 years of age and weighing 65 lbs should be properly secured by a seat belt. They can only sit in the rear sit until they reach 12 years of age or exceeds 65 inches in height.

(TITLE 21 SECTION 4803)

Florida

Children below 3 years must be seated in a child restraint system which should be federally approved. The law also required the seat to be crash tested.

An integrated child seat and a booster seat can be used once the child crosses 3 years.

(316.613)

Georgia

Children below eight years of age shall be properly restrained in a child passenger restraining system. The system must be approved by the United States Department of Transportation under provisions of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 213.

The law applies to private vehicles other than a taxicab or a public transit vehicle.

Below eight years a child cannot be seated in a front seat. If the rear seats are occupied or because of any special circumstances if someone needs to place the child in front seat than he can do only by installing a safety seat in the front seat.

Note – If the child needs to be placed in front seat because of some medical condition then a written statement from a physician is required.

Before 8 years if the child reaches 4’9″ he or she can be secured in a seat belt.

(O.C.G.A. § 40-8-76)

Hawaii

Children below four years should be seated in a restraint system which should fulfill the federal child safety seat requirements.

Above 4 years till 8 years you can also use a booster seat that meets federal motor vehicle safety standards.

If the child is 4 foot 9 inches tall or more than 40 pounds than he can be secured in a seat belt but he can only sit in a rear seat and not on the front seat.

(HRS SECTION 291-11.5)

Idaho

Children below 6 must necessarily be placed in a child safety restraint system – which should be according to the federal safety standards.

In no condition the child is allowed to sit in the front. Even if all vehicles seat belts are in use then the unrestrained child must be in the rear seat of the vehicle.

And even if the child needs nursing or any other physiological need, then also he should be seated in the rear seat.

(TITLE 49 CHAP 6 SECTION 49-672)

Illinois

Children below 8 years shall be secured in a child restraint system. If the child is travelling without parents then it’s parent’s responsibility to provide for an appropriate restraint system.

Above 40 pounds children can be seated with a lap-only belt if there is not a lap-shoulder belt available, but they are not allowed to seat in front. They can only be seated in the rear seats.

(625 ILCS 25/4 CHILD PASSENGER PROTECTION ACT)

Indiana

Children below 8 years should be seated in a restraint system and cannot sit in the front. After 8 – till 16 they can be secured using a vehicle’s seat belt.

(IC 9-19-11)

Iowa

Children below 1 year, weighing less than 20 lbs should be seated in a rear-facing child restraint system.

Till 6 years he or she must be secured in a child restraint system and the rear facing clause is overlooked after one year.

After 6 he or she can be secured by a safety belt or safety harness. This goes till he/she is 18 years of age.

(IOWA CODE 321.446)

Kansas

Children until the age of four should be seated in a restraining system that meets or exceeds FMVSS 213.

Till the age of 8 they need be places in some kind of safety seat. After 8 they can be secured in a vehicle’s seat belt.

(KSA 8-1343)

Kentucky

Children below 40 inches of height are necessarily required to be secured in a child restraint system which meets FMVSS 213.

Children between 40 and 57 inches tall can use a child booster seat.

(KRS 189.125)

Louisiana

Children below one year of age or weighing less than twenty pounds shall be seated in a rear-facing child safety seat.

Above one year till four years shall be restrained in a forward-facing child safety seat. The minimum weight should be 20 lbs and the maximum 40 lbs.

From 4 to 6 – and up to 60 lbs of weight booster seats can be used.

Children below 6 years or less than 60 lbs. must use a child restraint system.

After 6 years he is allowed to use the safety belt. The belt should be properly placed covering the shoulders and the whole of the body.

Note – If a child because of his age or weight can be placed in more than one category then he should be placed in the more protective category.

(RS 32:295)

Maine

Children below 40 lbs. of weight must use a child safety seat.

Above 40 lbs., till 80 lbs. he can ride in a federally approved child restraint system.

After 8 years till 18 years old (if they are more than 4 feet 9 inches in height) they can use a vehicle seat belt

Children are not allowed to use the front seat if they weigh less than 100 lbs and are below 12.

(MRS 2081)

Maryland

Children under the age of 8 years in a vehicle shall be secured in a child safety seat unless the child is 4 feet, 9 inches tall or taller.

(22–412.2)

Massachussetts

Children below 8 and less than 56 inches of height shall be secured by a child passenger restraint.

The safety restraint system shall be installed according to the manufacturer’s instructions and also needs to be properly fastened.

(CHAPTER90/SECTION7AA)

Michigan

Children below 4 years of age shall be seated in a child restraint system that meets the standards prescribed in 49 CFR 571.213 (aka FMVSS 213).

They can only be seated in the rear seat. However if the vehicle does not have a rear seat or if all available rear seats are occupied by children less than 4 years of age, then he/she may be allowed in the front seat which has a proper restraint system. The airbags should be deactivated.

Children between 4 and 8 years and less than 4 feet, 9 inches must also be necessarily placed in a child restraint system.

(SECTION 257.710D AND SECTION 257.710E(3B))

Minnesota

Children below 8 years and below 4’9″must ride in a child passenger restraint system.

The Minnesota Office of Traffic Safety writes, “This law is a minimum safety standard and does not reflect best practices for properly securing children within vehicles.

The vehicle can be stopped if any illegal activity is suspected.

(169.685-SUBD. 5)

Mississippi

Children below 4 years are required to ride in a properly-fitting child restraint system.

Children above 4 and till 7 and who measure less than 4’9″ or weigh less than 65 pounds can use a booster seat.

(MCA 63-7-301)

Missouri

Children less than four years of age shall be secured in a child passenger restraint system. This clause is regardless of weight of the child.

For the weight the clause states that all children weighing less than forty pounds shall be secured in a child passenger restraint system. This clause is regardless of age.

Children can be seated in a booster seat if they are at least four years of age, and weigh at least forty pounds and not more than eighty pounds, and who are also less than four feet nine inches tall. They should also not be more than 8 years of age.

A safety belt comes in use when the children are at least eighty pounds or more than four feet nine inches in height.

(RSMO 307.179)

Montana

Children below 6 years who weigh less than 60 pounds must be must be seated in a child safety restraint system.

(61-9-420)

Nebraska

Children up to two years of age shall use a rear-facing child passenger restraint system.

Children up to 8 years shall be seated using a child passenger restraint system which meets FMVSS 213 standards.

They can only be seated in a rear seat and are not allowed in front seats.

(60-6,267)

Nevada

Children below 6 years and weighing less than 60 pounds shall use a child restraint system approved by the NHTSA and should be according to the federal laws.

(NRS 484B.157)

New Hampshire

Children below 7 years or under 57 inches shall use a child restraint system which should be federally approved.

(RSA 265:107-A)

New Jersey

The general rule is that children should travel in the rear seat of the vehicle and not in the front.

Children below 2 years weighing less than 30 pounds shall be secured in a child restraint system having a 5-point harness. They should be seated rear facing.

The same is the requirement for children below 4 weighing less than 40 pounds with the only difference being that the children can be seated rear facing and forward facing.

From 4 – 8 years children can use booster seats.

And after they complete 8 years and are 57 inches tall or more than they can be secured by safety belts.

(NJSA 39:3-76.2A)

New Mexico

Children should never be seated in the front seat. If there is no rear seat then the front seat airbag must be deactivated.

Children below 1 year shall be seated in a rear-facing child passenger restraint device.

Children above 1 to 4 years of age weighing less than 40 pounds shall be seated in a passenger restraint device but the rear facing clause in omitted here.

Children above 4 to 6 years weighing less than 60 pounds can use booster seats.

Children above 6 to 12 years can use a seat belt. But before getting into a front seat or sitting with a seat belt they need to pass a 5 step test.

(66-7-369)

New York

All children below 4 years shall use a specifically designed seat which meets FMVSS 213 and it should be fixed permanently or fastened by a seat belt.

Children below 2 years shall be secured in a child restraint system. They should be seated rear facing.

Children below 4 years weighing more than 40 pounds must be must be seated in a child restraint system which has a lap-shoulder belt or a lap-only belt.

Children above 8 years till 16 years can use a lap-shoulder belt.

Generally all safety restraint seats are not a necessity in public transport vehicles but children under the age of four in this particular state – must be restrained in a federally approved car seat while riding on a school bus.

(SECTION 1229-C(1)) (VAT ART 33 SECTION 1229-C)

North Carolina

North Carolina is a little liberal in its child seating policies.

Children below 5 years weighing 40 pounds must be seated in a child restraint system and should be placed in the rear seat of the vehicle.

Children below 8 years and between 40 and 80 pounds can be restrained by a properly fitted lap-only belt if a lap and shoulder belt in the restraint system is not available.

(G.S. 20-137.1)

North Dakota

All children below 8 years shall be seated in a passenger restraint device.

A child can use seat belt if he/she is at least 57 inches tall (4′ 9″) – even if he is younger than 8 years.

After 8 till 17 children are free to use seat belts.

(CODE CHAPTER 39-21-41.2)

Ohio

Children below 4 years weighing less than 40 pounds must be seated in a child restraint system.

From 4 years till 8 years the booster seat option becomes open for children.

Children from 8 to 15 years should use a child restraint system or an Occupant Restraining Device.

An Occupant Restraining Device is defined as seat safety belt, shoulder belt, harness, or other safety device for restraining a person that satisfies the minimum the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards.

(4511.81) and (4513.263)

Oklahoma

Children below 2 years of age must use a rear-facing child passenger restraint system.

Children above 2 years and below 4 years must be secured in a child passenger restraint system and the rear facing clause is omitted here.

Booster seats become an option for children from 4 to 8 years who are less than 4’9”.

Children who are 8 or older or taller than 4’9” can use a seat belt.

(47.11-1112)

Oregon

Children below 2 years should be seated in a child restraint system and should be rear facing.

If the child crosses two years but is still weighing less than 20 pounds, then also the seating option remains the same.

Children weighing 40 pounds should be properly seated in the restraint system as per the regulations of Department of Transportation under ORS 815.055

Children weighing more than 40 pounds and are 4’9″ are eligible for a safety belt.

Children who are 8 years of age or are taller than 4’9″ can also use a safety belt or a safety harness.

Pennsylvania

Children below 2 years should be seated in a child restraint system and should be rear facing.

Children above 2 years and below 4 years must be secured in a child passenger restraint system and the rear facing clause is omitted here.

Booster seats and even seat belts become an option for children from 4 to 8 years who are less than 4’9”.

Children who are 8 or older or taller than 4’9” can use a seat belt.

The above discussed laws are highly summarized. You can get further details about car seat and front seat laws in Pennsylvania by clicking on the link below.

(VEHICLE CODE, 75 PA.C.S. 4581)

Rhode Island

Children below 2 years and weighing less than 30 pounds should be seated in a child restraint system and should be rear facing. The restraint system should be approved by FMVSS 213.

If the children have outgrown their size and weight than they should be seated in a front facing restraint seat.

Booster seats and even seat belts and a shoulder harness become an option for children from 4 to 8 years who are more than 57 inches in height.

Children who are 8 or older (till 18) can use a seat belt and/or shoulder harness system.

(SECTION 31-22-22)

South Carolina

Children below 2 years and weighing less than 30 pounds should be seated in a child restraint system and should be rear facing. The restraint system should be in accordance with the federal standards.

From 2 to 4 years booster seats can be opted but the children should be seated in rear seat of the vehicle with a lap-shoulder belt.

Booster seats and even seat belts and a shoulder harness become an option for children from 4 to 8 years who are more than 57 inches in height. Seat belts should be fastened according to the following norms:

the lap belt fits across the child’s thighs and hips and not across the abdomen;

the shoulder belt crosses the center of the child’s chest and not the neck; and

the child is able to sit with his back straight against the vehicle seat back cushion with his knees bent over the vehicle’s seat edge without slouching.

Children who are 8 or older (till 18) can use a seat belt and/or shoulder harness system.

(TITLE 56 CHAPTER 5 ARTICLE 47 SECTION 56-5-6410)

South Dakota

South Dakota has opted very liberal policies for children safety and seating options.

Children just below 5 years of age weighing at least 40 pounds shall be properly secured in a federally approved child restraint system. Generally the laws in other states opt for minimum 8 years.

After 5 years the children have an option to use the safety belt.

Children this small generally don’t fit safely in a car’s seat belt. The belt is an ideal option for children above 8 years to 12 years and having a minimum of 4’9″ height. The laws of South Dakota do not mean that this is the best protective measure for the children.

(32-37-1)

Tennessee

Children below 1 year or weighing less than 20 pounds should be seated in a child restraint system and should be rear facing.

Children above 1 year till 3 years must be secured in a child passenger restraint system in a forward-facing position in the rear seat.

Booster seats and even seat belts become an option for children from 4 to 8 years who are less than 4’9”. Although the seating in the rear seat clause still remains at this age and height.

Children who are 8 or older or taller than 4’9” can use a seat belt.

(T.C.A. 55-9-602)

Texas

Texas State is – any child below 8 years of age but at least four feet and nine inches in height, can use a seat belt.

(SEC. 545.412)

Utah

Children below 8 years shall be properly restrained in a child restraint system.

Additional to the above general rule there is an exception – Children below 8 are not required to be in a child restraint if they are at least 57 inches tall. At that point, they can use a lap-shoulder belt.

(TITLE 41 CHAPTER 6A SECTION 1803)

Vermont

Children below 1 year or weighing less than 20 pounds should be seated in a child restraint system and should be rear facing which shall not be installed in front of an active air bag.

Children above 1 year till 8 years must be secured in a child passenger restraint system.

Safety belt system becomes open for children from 8 to 18 years.

(23 V.S.A. § 1258)

Virginia

Children below 8 years shall be properly restrained in a child restraint system.

Children below 2 years should be seated in a child restraint system and should be rear facing.

Rear-facing child restraint devices must be placed in the back seat of a vehicle. In the event the vehicle does not have a back seat, the child restraint device may be placed in the front passenger seat only if the vehicle is either not equipped with a passenger side airbag or the passenger side airbag has been deactivated.

Children can no longer ride unrestrained in the rear cargo area of vehicles.

(CODE OF VIRGINIA ARTICLE 13 – SECTION 46.2)

Washington

Children below 8 years or below 4’9″ of height must ride in a child restraint which complies with FMVSS 213. After the required age or height (whichever comes first) they can use safety belt as to secure themselves. The belt should be properly adjusted and fastened around the child’s body.

Till 13 years of age children are not allowed to sit in the front. After 13 they can do so.

(RCW 46.61.687)

Washington, D.C.

In Washington D.C. the rules are on the strict side because of heavy traffic and dense population.

Children below 16 years are required to be properly restrained in an approved child safety restraint system or a seat belt.

Children below 2 years weighing less than 40 pounds or having a height of 40 inches must use a rear-facing child restraint seat.

Children below 8 years can use an installed infant, convertible (toddler) or booster child safety seat. Note – The booster seat shall only be used with both a lap and shoulder belt.

(DC CODE SECTION 50-1703)

West Virginia

The general rules in West Virginia are:

Children below eight years shall be properly secured in a child passenger safety device system.

Children below eight years and at least four feet nine inches tall shall be sufficiently secured by the vehicle’s seat belt.

(17C-15-46)

Wisconsin

Children below 1 year or weighing less than 20 pounds should be seated in a child restraint system and should be rear facing. The restraint system should be positioned in the back seat of a vehicle, if the vehicle has a back seat.

Children above 1 year till 4 years must be secured in a child passenger restraint system in a forward-facing position in the rear seat. The restraint system should be positioned in the back seat of a vehicle, if the vehicle has a back seat.

Booster seats and even seat belts become an option for children from 4 to 8 years who are more than 57 inches tall and weigh more than 40 pounds but less than 80 pounds.

Children who are 8 or older or taller than 4’9” can use a seat belt.

(CHAPTER 347.48.4)

Wyoming

Children below 8 years and younger must be properly secured in a child safety restraint system in the rear seat.

If all available rear seats are occupied by children or if there is no rear seat, then a child less than 8 years of age may be positioned in the child restraint system in the front seat, including a rear-facing child restraint system if the front passenger air bag is deactivated.

A seat belt is also an option for children below 8 years provided the lap and shoulder belt fits properly across the collarbone, chest and hips of the child.

The belt does not pose any danger to the neck, face or abdominal area of the child in the event of a crash or sudden stop.

(31-5-1303)

General Guidelines for Kids regarding where to sit in vehicles

Before we look at the laws state by state – here are some general age limits and seating options which are applicable in most of the states.

If you want the specific car seat laws for kids for your state then scroll down.

The following are some general guidelines:

Till Age 2

Children from birth to age 2 and till 40 pounds of weight should generally be seated in rear facing car seat.

A rear facing car seat provides maximum cushion to the neck and spinal cord of children.

2 to 8 (or older)

After 2 till 8 children should be seated in a forward facing car seat. Usually, the maximum weight limit is between 40 and 65 pounds.

A forward facing car sear minimizes the forward movement in crashes and mishaps.

8 to 12

A belt positioning booster seat becomes an option for ages 8 to 12. The height limit is 4 feet, 9 inches.

A booster seat ensures the seat belt fits over the strongest parts of a child’s body and positions the body at the safest angle and height.

13 or more

After 13 the front seat option is available for the kids. Teenagers can ride in the front seat but seat belt is a necessity. This is generally a law for every state.

State Laws for Childs seating positions

USA has strict laws about car seats, especially for safety seats for kids and the positioning of the safety seats. All states have different laws, or at least some terms and conditions vary. Different laws in different states are a confusing issue specially when travelling or switching between states.

Keeping this in mind we have compiled a complete list about the laws of 50 US states on car seats and when can kids sit in the front seat. The section or the article which contains the specific law is mentioned in the end of the law. We check and update these laws according to the authority updates once every year, so that you can be always up to date.

These laws don’t mean that they provide the best safety measures. The laws are made keeping the tolerance and acceptability of the general public. Some believe that working according to the laws is the safest step for the kids – but this is not true. In fact occupant restraint laws should be considered as the minimum standards required so that you don’t get a ticket.

Some important Notes before we look state by state laws:

Child Restraint System or A Restraint System

A “Child Restraint System” or a “Restraint System” is a specifically designed seating system, including a belt positioning seat (or booster seat) that meets federal motor vehicle safety standards — this should be indicated somewhere on the seat itself.

The restraint system should be federally approved, and must be appropriate for the size and weight of the child and should be installed within and attached safely and securely to the motor vehicle in accordance with the instructions for installation and attachment provided by the manufacturer of the child restraint system.

Safety Belt is not a restraint system

A vehicle’s safety belt is not defined as a child restraint system. Safety belts are not designed for children under 4’9″ and, therefore, do not protect young children.

However a safety belt or safety harness should be positioned low across the thighs and the shoulder belt should be positioned over the collarbone and away from the neck.

Public Transports are not liable to install safety seats

Taxis and public transportation buses are exempt from occupant restraint law. However, it is recommended, especially in taxis, to use an appropriate child restraint.

Federally Approved

This means the car seat meets the federals standards set in FMVSS 213. Car seat manufacturers self-certify that the car seat meets federal standards by crash testing the child restraint to ensure it meets certain crash criteria.

“And/Or” 

If the law says “and” this means the child needs to meet both (or all) criteria set in the law. “Or” means the child can meet one criteria or the other.

The bottom line

Even low-impact crashes leave serious marks and result in serious injuries to adults seated in front seat. So if you are travelling with small kids never seat them in the front seat – until they reach the required age, weight and height limits.

Many local fire departments, hospitals, and other community organizations offer car seat installation and inspection stations. Parents can find these by visiting or calling the following resources:

Call 1-866-SEATCHECK (866-732-8243)

You can also visit SeatCheck.org from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to receive safety updates.

Ride Safe and Enjoy with Your Kids.

Sheryl Brown
 

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